Diagnostics Available

Procedures

 

EEG:

This test uses small electrodes applied to the scalp by a technician. The patient is asked to perform various activities such as hyperventilation and sleeping while the electrodes passively measure the brainís electrical activity. This test is often performed when seizures are suspected. This test is performed in a neurophysiology lab at the hospital.

EMG:

This test is almost always performed in conjunction with the nerve conduction study (NCS). During this test, a very thin needle is pushed into selected muscles of interest to listen to the muscleís electrical activity. This test provides indirect evidence for injury of nerve roots leaving the spinal column or to make a diagnosis of a systemic muscle disease (myopathy). This test is performed at the neurology office.

NCS:

A nerve conduction study (NCS) involves a series of small electrical shocks administered to nerves traveling in the upper or lower limbs. This is particularly helpful to localize sites where a peripheral nerve has been compressed as it travels across a joint. This test is performed at the neurology office.

EPís:

Evoked potentials (EPís) involve a series of small electrical shocks delivered to the ankle or wrist while electrodes applied to the hair measure the brainís electrical activity. This test is performed in a neurophysiology lab at the hospital.

Procedures:

IME:

An Independent Medical Evaluation (IME) involves a thorough review of management for a particular condition followed by a neurological examination. A summary of the conditions, both active and resolved, is created along with a list of recommended treatments. This is a single visit that occurs in the neurology office.

 
 
 


Use these pages to learn more about our practice, Dr. Krane, and our location in the First Hill neighborhood of Seattle. We hope you find these pages helpful and informative when making health care decisions. We also encourage you to explore www.seattleneurology.org where you can learn more about various neurological conditions and follow a monthly blog written by Dr. Krane.